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3 Tragic Stories from the childhood of Charles Manson

In August 1969, Charles Manson’s family brutally killed 9 people as part of an insane plan to bring about a race war. The popularity of his victims, the horrific way they were murdered and also Manson’s own unique brand of madness have left him imprinted in the history as one of the most horrible serial killers of all time. Read 10 devastating stories around his childhood:

  1. His mother named him “No Name”

Charles Manson’s mother was a 16-year-old girl named Kathleen Maddox, and his father was a transient laborer named “Colonel,” whom he never met. Kathleen may have been a prostitute, although Manson denies that’s true. Regardless of how she made her money, Kathleen was a far cry from the world’s best mother. When Manson was born, she didn’t even bother giving him a name. When the nurses handed her the paper, she wrote “No Name,” and to this day, his birth certificate is registered as “No Name Maddox.”

2.His Mother Traded Him For A Pitcher Of Beer

According to Manson’s family, Kathleen traded Charles for a pitcher of beer shortly after he was born.

When he was still an infant, Kathleen took her son to a restaurant and had him resting on her lap when she sparked up a conversation with the waitress. The waitress was eager to become a mother herself, and thinking that baby Manson was cute, she joked that she’d buy him from Kathleen.

“A pitcher of beer and he’s yours,” was Kathleen’s reply. The waitress probably thought she was joking, but she brought Kathleen an extra pitcher anyway. What she didn’t expect was that as soon as Kathleen finished her beer, she sneaked out of the restaurant—and left Charles behind.

Manson only made his way back home because his uncle found out what had happened. He tracked down the waitress a few days later and got the boy back to his mother.

3. He Was Illiterate

When he was 16, Manson was psychologically tested while in prison. The results were troubling. Although he had an IQ of 109, he could barely read or write a single word. He had spent four years of his life in boys’ schools, and he’d barely learned a thing.

The psychiatrist who diagnosed Manson blamed many if his problems on his strained relationship with his mother. He noted the amount of “rejection, instability and psychic trauma” that Manson had experienced and said that he was constantly struggling to impress the other boys because of his “lack of parental love.”